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Draw to Make
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Draw to Make

刊登 12.06.2019
Simon Lincoln

Simon Lincoln is a partner overseeing Make’s Sydney studio. Simon established the Sydney studio in 2014 and is also leading the design and delivery of Wynyard Place, our first project in Australia. Simon has been at Make since 2005 and worked across the practice’s international portfolio in London, China and the UAE.

Here Simon discusses the role of architectural drawing in his day-to-day job at Make and why he expects to see a “renaissance” in hand drawing soon.

How would you describe your relationship with architectural drawing?

As architects, it would be very difficult to perform our role without the need to draw, whether it’s using CAD, hand sketching or another form. It’s engrained in our profession and our daily working life – it’s inseparable from what we do and how we communicate.

Drawing gives me time to think freely, to explore and resolve challenges of differing complexity.

How often does drawing feature in your workload at Make?

Daily. The typical drawings I produce are quick hand sketches to communicate an idea or solution for other team members, clients or consultants.

Do you have a preference for form (ie, manual drawings versus digitally produced renderings)? Do think these differ in their ability to convey ideas or authenticity?

I don’t have a preference; I think all media can be applied appropriately to the task in hand.

Nearly everyone understands a 3D render, and most understand diagrams. However, few understand 2D plans. Therefore, there tends to be a heavy reliance upon photorealistic renders, which I completely appreciate. The 3D render is often undeniable and well curated, which has its pros and cons.

Now the industry is moving more into the realm of VR and AR. At Make we’re working on several projects using VR, which is very exciting!

Do you think certain types of drawings are better suited for particular types of schemes?

It would be difficult to classify a style or type of drawing for a particular building/project. There is a tool for every job and every stage.

What tools do you gravitate towards when creating a drawing?

I tend to use pen and paper initially, and then I gain some reassurance in CAD/3D.

Do you think architects starting out today have a different relationship to drawing than those a decade or two older than them?

Almost every graduate I interview can produce 3D renders, which is great for us. Not many offer hand drawings in the portfolio. I think we’ll see a renaissance in hand drawing in the coming years. Hopefully this is fuelled by The Architecture Drawing Prize!

In my opinion an individual who draws/sketches has an appeal over students who don’t.

Does the culture around architectural drawing vary across the different countries you’ve worked in?

Our profession is international, and the way we communicate reflects this. There are small differences in the output of the drawings we produce, but the art and culture of drawing remain consistent. Clear communication, legibility and accuracy are required without geographical boundaries.

 

This Q&A forms part of our series on The Architecture Drawing Prize: an open drawing competition curated by Make, WAF and Sir John Soane’s Museum to highlight the importance of drawing in architecture.