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Choosing architectural modelmaking
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Choosing architectural modelmaking

刊登 17.06.2020
Susie Cole

The annual New Blades modelmaking exhibition and recruitment fair showcases the final year projects from student modelmakers across UK and Irish universities. With the 2020 show cancelled, we talk to Susie Cole, one of our modelmakers, about her projects at New Blades 2019 and to find out why she decided to focus on architectural models.

 

My interest in architectural modelmaking was piqued in 2019, when Make’s modelshop team lead, Paul Miles, gave a talk at my university. I wasn’t sure which route I was going to go down, but I chose architectural modelmaking because it allows me to contribute to an integrated design process for projects that impact the fabric of our built environment. I have the opportunity to create models that support and influence the design of buildings and masterplans, which is incredibly exciting. 

During my course I worked on a variety of projects. The two I showcased at New Blades in 2019 were:  

Miami Street Scene

Inspired by my travels to Miami, my final major project presented an opportunity for modelling the interesting Art Deco facades of the buildings, colourful architecture, and the variation in the daytime and night-time scene/ atmosphere on the same street. It was the biggest architectural model I’d made, with more elements than I’d dealt with before – the detailing of the façade design and recreating the lighting, which is quite an iconic part of the night scene on Ocean Drive. Extensive research of architectural models was required to complete the model successfully

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Eyeball 

New Blades is not exclusively architectural models. It enabled me to demonstrate use of a range of materials and processes, and create a display piece that is larger than the real scale (10:1), as opposed to in architectural modelling where most models are at a small scale or detail parts created at 1:1. It was interesting to explore a complex structure in more detail working at that scale. It was interesting describing the intricate parts of the eye in a variety of materials and processes, some are incorporated in to more experimental architectural models – included 3D printing, resin casting, layering copper foil, and using copper and silver leaf to create the represent the different anatomical structures 

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This post forms part of our #futuremodelmakers campaign to celebrate the work of the 2020 modelmaking graduates.